Low FODMAP Ginger Tea

Low FODMAP Ginger Tea

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Three-ingredient Low FODMAP Ginger Tea – a soothing cup of freshly grated ginger steeped in hot water and sweetened with a touch of maple syrup.

Low FODMAP Ginger Tea

Have you ever had ginger tea before? I had never heard of it until I went to Santosha for yoga teacher training. It’s said to be one of the world’s oldest beverages and has been widely recommended by Eastern medicine practitioners for centuries.

Ginger is thought to have many health benefits including reducing inflammation (1), relieving menstrual discomfort (2), and supporting the digestive system (3)(4). And, it happens to be low FODMAP! In fact, there were no FODMAPs detected in ginger when it was tested by Monash University.

Low FODMAP Ginger Tea

I love the flavor and sharpness of fresh ginger and use it often in my cooking, but never thought to put it into drinks. It wasn’t until I started going to Ginger and Jamu, the cafe right downstairs from our training, where my fellow yoga students and I tried it. It quickly became my nightly beverage of choice.

I’ve read it’s much more common (and traditional) to sweeten ginger tea with honey. However, being that honey is high in FODMAPs, I turned to my go-to low FODMAP honey substitute, maple syrup, for this low FODMAP ginger tea. It’s sweet, but not too sweet. Just the way I like it.

Low FODMAP Ginger Tea

Ginger Tea Tips

The ginger flavor will intensify the longer the tea sits. Personally, I don’t mind this, but you can strain the ginger out of the tea after letting it steep to help maintain a consistent flavor while you enjoy it. I don’t have one, but I imagine a reusable tea strainer would work great. 

If you don’t strain it, there will be ginger pieces at the bottom which are safe to consume. However, I usually don’t. Instead, I will drink the tea until there is about an inch of liquid remaining (which contains most of the ginger) and discard it.

Kitchen gadgets I use to make this low FODMAP ginger tea include a cheese grater for the ginger and an electric kettle for my hot water. If you’re a tea drinker and don’t have an electric kettle, I highly recommend getting one. I love mine! It heats up super quick and helps reduce the number of dirty dishes I create. 🙂

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Low FODMAP Ginger Tea

Low FODMAP Ginger Tea


  • Author: Em Schwartz, MS, RDN
  • Prep Time: 5 mins
  • Total Time: 5 mins
  • Yield: 1
  • Category: Drink
  • Method: Kettle
  • Cuisine: Asian

Description

Three-ingredient Low FODMAP Ginger Tea – a soothing cup of freshly grated ginger steeped in hot filtered water and sweetened with a touch of maple syrup.


Ingredients

  • 1 tsp. freshly grated ginger
  • 1 ½ cups (12 oz.) hot filtered water
  • 1 Tbsp. maple syrup (or to taste)

Instructions

  1. Place freshly grated ginger in the bottom of a coffee cup. Pour hot water over ginger and let sit for 2-3 minutes or until ginger settles.
  2. Optional step – Strain when desired ginger flavor strength is achieved.
  3. Add maple syrup to taste. Serve warm.

Notes

The ginger flavor will intensify the longer the tea sits. You can strain the ginger or use a tea infuser to help maintain a consistent flavor.

The ginger at the bottom is safe to consume, however, I usually drink the tea until there is about an inch of liquid remaining (which contains most of the ginger) and discard it.

I use and love this electric kettle to make hot water for my tea.

Keywords: Hot tea, plant-based, vegetarian

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References

  1. Grzanna, R., Lindmark, L., & Frondoza, C. G. (2005). Ginger—An herbal medicinal product with broad anti-inflammatory actions. Journal of Medicinal Food, 8(2), ahead of print. doi: 10.1089/jmf.2005.8.125
  2. Ozgoli, G., Goli, M., & Moattar, F. (2009). Comparison of effects of ginger, mefenamic acid, and ibuprofen on pain in women with primary dysmenorrhea. Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, 15(2), 129-132. doi: 10.1089/acm.2008.0311
  3. Ernst, E. & Pittler, M. H. (2000). Efficacy of ginger for nausea and vomiting: A systematic review of randomized clinical trials. British Journal of Anaesthesia, 84(3), 367-371.
  4. Wu, K. L., Rayner, C. K., Chuah, S. K., Changchien, C. S., Lu, S. N., Chiu, Y. C., … Lee, C. M. (2008). Effects of ginger on gastric emptying and motility in healthy humans. European Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 20(5), 436-440. doi: 10.1097/MEG.0b013e3282f4b224.

I'm a foodie and dietitian living with IBS who loves creating easy and delicious low FODMAP recipes for you (and me)! I've been trained on the use of the low FODMAP diet for IBS by Monash University and create my recipes based on their (green) low FODMAP serving sizes.

2 Comments

  1. I’m a huge fan of ginger tea, but I haven’t tried using fresh ginger. I’m super curious about the combination of ginger and maple syrup. I can’t wait to give this a try!!

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